Friday, March 27, 2015

Love in a Glass: Stoller Family Estate Pinot Noir Rose

The phone rang. I looked at the caller-ID and my little heart started racing as if it was a call from a former love. It was the call I had been waiting for. It was from Stoller Family Estate in the Willamette Valley. They were letting me know my Spring Wine Club shipment was getting ready to be packed and while they were at it, was there anything else they could send me - - perhaps more of their Stoller Pinot Noir Rose? 

Yes-yes-yes! Fill me up with bottles and bottles of Stoller Rose - 2014! Now I can finally finish up the last two bottles of the 2013 that I have been hiding in the wine cooler. Hiding from who? From me! There's also a few bottles of 2013 Provence rose, as well. I guess I feared there was going to be a 2014 rose shortage. It is also about storing some fond memories. 

I think it is very possible to fall in love with the experiences you have had with a wine, as much as it is to fall in love with the wine, itself. If your two loves go together, then as a lover of wine, you are blessed.  

One of the world's greatest wine collectors is Park B. Smith, a textile entrepreneur in his late 70's,  who lives in an New England town of Northwestern Connecticut. About eight years ago Mr. Smith left a quote with Eric Asimov, wine writer for the New York Times, and it has resonated with me, ever since. 
“Something happens to people who love wine. You really discover a camaraderie. It’s not like coin collecting or something cynical. It’s like sharing love in a glass.” 
Besides my love of a crisp cool dry rose, especially those from Provence, there has always been something about this Oregon Pinot Noir rose from Stoller that has captivated me. On a hot day, I will often crave the palate of this peach colored
wine that expresses notes of strawberries, raspberries, watermelon and the crisp fruity acidity of ruby red grapefruit. 

It has also been about the experiences I have had at their winery, the camaraderie I had with friends who had joined me at the estate; from the stroll through the Stoller Estate Vineyards talking about the soil, the canopy of the vines, and even my personal future; to another visit at Stoller enjoying a picnic sack lunch out on the beautiful winery grounds with other wine writing peers. In those visits we were sharing camaraderie and most certainly we were sharing "love in a glass."  

My last visit to Stoller was three years ago, and the winery gave me one of their signature etched Riedel Oregon Pinot Noir glasses. It was a token that meant a lot, as whenever I look at the glass, whether it is in the cupboard or I am using it, the glass brings back so many wonderful memories of events and people. In fact when I left Oregon after my last visit,  I even held the glass in my lap all the way back home on the airplane. Check the luggage, but let me hold my glass - my memories, my love in a glass. 

Monday, March 23, 2015

Thoughts From A Former Tasting Room Staff

The other day I was working on my blog. I decided to change the coloring and just freshen it up. As I was "cleaning" it, I happened to notice some former blogs I wrote, especially one where I ranted about some of the customers I have met along the way.

Now you could wag your finger at me and admonish me for "picking" on the customer, but technically the wine customer is typically savvy about the world and if not, usually eager to grow and learn. However, like any group of people, there are always those who will try manipulate, mangle, and mash things up to get their way.

The lesson to be learned here is that no matter what kind of bullshit the customer gives you, it is important to keep smiling and/or refer the customer to your manager. If there is no manager around, then just keep smiling and create scenarios and dialogue in your mind to get you through it. For example, it is okay for you to visualize in your mind how when the customer isn't looking, you pour wine from the spit bucket into their glass. Of course, you really don't want to do that, as you want to still sell them some wine.

Here are a few tidbits of dialogue I created in mind of things I wanted to say - - but didn't. Just remember, keep smiling.

Me saying to customer: "Gosh, as much as we would like to accommodate you, we don't stack discounts. Our computer doesn't recognize them."

Me thinking: "Oh forget about all of those discounts. Why don't we just give you a key to the winery so you can help yourself to as much free wine anytime you want? Can I come over and clean your toilet, too? Really. I don't mind."

But I don't say that. I just smile.

Me saying to customer: "No problem. It's easy to see how we get mixed up."

Me thinking: "Ahem - and earlier you were telling somebody on the phone that the manager was your best friend, so you could get a special deal and now you don't remember what your "best friend" looks like."

But I don't say that. I just smile.

Me saying to new hot shot industry person who brings his friends in to dazzle them with his self importance two minutes before closing time: "Really, that is amazing! You sure know a lot about wine."

Me thinking: "You effing idiot. I know about you and I also know that you finally got your first job when you were 38 years old because your folks called in some favors and you've been living in their basement. Tell your brilliant wine data to the wine association. Do your friends know that your self named title of "Distributor" really means that you are the delivery person?"

But I don't say that. I just smile.

Me saying to customer who claims the Cabernet Sauvignon is bad because of the sediment (tartaric crystals): "Your friend is right. This doesn't mean that the wine is bad. If anything, this is a good sign. It shows that the wine has been treated with a gentle touch and not been overly fined and filtered. In Europe these crystals are accepted and appreciated as a sign that the wine is a natural one and you will be rewarded with all of the complexities that the wine diamonds indicate."

Me thinking: "Shut up you little freak. Listen to your friend. He obviously knows wine more than you do, you little whiney-pee-pants. Now lower your #%&%# voice."

But I don't say that. I just smile.

Me saying to customer: "Gosh, I am really sorry. We are not equipped to give out rainchecks for sold out vintages."

Me thinking: "What do you think vintage means and where do you propose we get these 2002 grapes at? Now mark an "L" on your forehead and get the hell out of here."

But I don't say that. I just smile.

Me saying to customer: "Wow. Good question. I am not sure when we'll produce a sweet white Zinfandel with a screw top that sells for $6.99."

Me thinking: "When hell freezes over."

But I don't say that. I just smile.

Me saying to customer: "Thanks for coming in. It was good seeing you and please come back."

Me thinking: "It's about time you asshole. It's now 7:20 pm. I thought you would never leave. We close at 5:00 pm and you show up at 5:20 pm, beg to come in for one minute to buy a bottle, you ate the last of the food, drank more than your share of free wine, and you didn't buy a damn thing. I've been standing now on my feet for over nine hours and haven't sat or ate since 8:00 am. What do you think we are - your own personal happy hour? "

But I don't say what I've been thinking. I just smile. Remember, just keep smiling. 

Thursday, March 05, 2015

Scintillation: Syncline Wine Cellars

Scintillating Definition: (adjective) 
sparkling or shining brightly, effervescent: "the scintillating sun"
brilliantly and excitingly clever or skillful: "the audience loved his scintillating wit"

Exactly! The audience loved his scintillating "Scintillation." 

When I first saw this exciting label and the fact there was a new bubbly in the Northwest, I searched it out.  I had no idea where this new wine was coming from. I even asked a distributor, who also happened to be the rep for Syncline Wine Cellars if they had heard of this new sparkling wine. They hadn't - - yet. It had to be the best kept secret around. Finally, it showed up in print on the distributor's catalog, and I was thrilled and rather anxious to get a hold of it. Indeed, it turned out this new bubbly was from Syncline Wine Cellars, located in Lyle, near the Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area in the southern part of Washington State. 

A few years ago, I had the pleasure to visit Syncline with a group of other wine and travel writers. We met up with James and Poppie Mantone at their modest facility tucked away in the gorgeous green woodsy setting. It is a working farm, yet a peaceful setting that takes you away from all of the problems of the world.  The Mantones wine emphasis is on Rhone varietals, biodynamic farming practices, and of course their beautiful location.  

James Mantone (photo by: W5)
Needless to say I was pleasantly surprised when I discovered Syncline was also producing a sparkler, and I was able to purchase a few bottles last spring. Knowing the reputation of the Mantones and their passion for beautiful and well made wines, I was comfortable to purchase this bubbly without a preview of tasting. 

The Scintillation label is produced as a brut and also a brut rose. Lately my passion has been sparkling dry roses and I always get so excited to spot a new one.  

Scintillation Brut Rose is produced with 58% Pinot Noir and 42% Chardonnay from the Celilo Vineyard.  This vineyard rests on a bluff at Underwood Mountain, and overlooks the Columbia River Gorge. The vineyard can boast as having some of the oldest vines in the area. The Pinot Noir sourced for Scintillation is from a two-acre block planted in 1972. The Chardonnay is from an original block, planted in 1981. 

The sparking rose is one of my favorite colors of wine, as it is a pale salmon color with many-many-many very fine bubbles. If you can get your nose close enough to the wine without the bubbles tickling, it wafts of spring flowers and strawberries. Of course, it tickles the palate leaving a taste of fresh strawberries, kiwi, and lively acids. It's fresh and crisp.

If you love this style of wine like I do - - you need this one. With spring around the corner, it is perfect for porch sippin'. 

Monday, March 02, 2015

Revisiting an old friend: Morrison Lane Syrah - 2005

Syrah is one of France's most noblest black grape varieties. This dark inky grape is known for its dark brooding color, distinctive and intense nose and palate. Here on the West Coast people will often think of California for Syrah. However, I will differ on that. Washington State, notably those Syrah vines from Walla Walla AVA, and especially now with the new "The Rocks District of Milton-Freewater" AVA across the border from Walla Walla, is known for some of the finest Syrah in the world, especially in North America. 

It's been my opinion, Syrah grown on rocks aside, that some of the best Syrah has come out of the old vineyard of Morrison Lane. Long time Walla Wallans, Dean and Verdie Morrison planted their first blocks of Syrah in 1994. It was a four-acre block. Now known as their "Old Block Syrah," more Syrah vines would come, as they planted 2.8 acres in 1998 and a year later, 6.5 acres. Local wineries such as K-Vintners, Walla Walla Vintners, Bunchgrass Winery, and others have had great success using the Morrison Lane fruit, especially the Syrah. So, it only made sense when the Morrison family opened their own winery in 2002, and produced their own estate Syrah along with other interesting estate grape varieties such as Counoise, and Carmenere. 

The first time I sampled Morrison Lane Syrah - 2005 was in June 2009 at a Vintage Walla Walla library tasting. A few weeks after that event, I made it a point to stop by the Morrison Lane tasting room to purchase a couple of bottles. Last year when Sean Morrison, Dean and Verdie's son, brought a few out of the library and was selling them, I added a few more bottles of Morrison Lane Syrah - 2005 to my collection.  In January I brought a bottle out to share at a special birthday party for my mother. Oh it was so lovely, I am happy to say I still have a few more bottles hidden.  At our family event, those family members and good friends, who are wine drinkers, made it a point to ask me about the wine in their glass, as they commented about how elegant and smooth it was. 

The Morrison Lane Syrah - 2005 was inky, rich, and indeed so smooth. Ten years in the bottle and I expected it to be turning more into dried fruits, leather, but this wasn't the case. It was perfect for my taste. There was still the blueberries, licorice, and smoke hanging on with every sip, and the finish was rich, long and smooth. 

Perhaps by the end of this year, I may open another bottle - - but this time I may not share. 
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